For decorative purposes, a colorant is typically added to the plastic. The pieces of a Rubik's cube are typically black. During production, colored stickers are put on the outside of the cube to denote the color of a side. The plastics that are used during production are supplied to the manufacturer in a pellet form complete with the filler and colorants. These pellets can then be loaded into the molding machines directly.
If you were around in the 1980’s and did not live under a rock, you had a Rubik’s cube.  It was the 3D combination puzzle that had children and adults mesmerized trying to solve the impossible puzzle.  We would spend hours twisting and turning the cube to figure the solution. The cube was invented by an Hungarian professor of architecture, Erno Rubik, in 1974.  Although it took Erno over one month to solve his very own puzzle, it  became a fad and everyone had one. Consequently, it became the world’s best selling toy ever at that time. Rubiks Build It Solve It Instructions
The Rubik's cube appears to be made up of 26 smaller cubes. In its solved state, it has six faces, each made up of nine small square faces of the same color. While it appears that all of the small faces can be moved, only the corners and edges can actually move. The center cubes are each fixed and only rotate in place. When the cube is taken apart it can be seen that the center cubes are each connected by axles to an inner core. The corners and edges are not fixed to anything. This allows them to move around the center cubes. The cube maintains its shape because the corners and edges hold each other in place and are retained by the center cubes. Each piece has an internal tab that is retained by the center cubes and trapped by the surrounding pieces. These tabs are shaped to fit along a curved track that is created by the backs of the other pieces. The central cubes are fixed with a spring and rivet and retain all the surrounding pieces. The spring exerts just the right pressure to hold all the pieces in place while giving enough flexibility for a smooth and forgiving function. Rubiks Build It Solve It
There are 5 different positions your cube can be in now, one of which could be solved. The rest of them have all four corners solved, so do the required amount of U moves so that every corner is in its right place. 2 of the 4 remaining possibilities have a solved bar (as mentioned above, where all three colours on that side are the same), and the other 2 have no solved bars.
Do you remember those complicated little Rubik’s block that we would sit there trying to figure out for what seems like hours? Did any of you guys/girls ever solve them? Maybe all it takes for us to solve the “cube” would be for us to see what it’s all about. While there are many mesmerizing toys that are about to emerge into our world, today, we would like to take a close look in this Rubik’s Build It Solve It Review, because we believe this is the one-way ticket to finally solving the cube! Rubiks Build It Solve It Review
Over the next few years, Rubik worked with a manufacturer to allow production of the cube on a mass scale. After three years of development, the first cubes were available on toy store shelves in Budapest. While the cube remained popular in Hungry, the political atmosphere of the time made it difficult for it to be introduced in the United States. The two men who were most responsible for making the cube an international success were Dr. Laczi Tibor and Tom Kremer of Seven Towns Ltd., London. Seven Towns licensed the Rubik Cube invention from Professor Rubik for worldwide distribution. Dr. Tibor worked within Hungry to convince bureaucrats to allow the technology out of the country. Kremer found a United States toy maker, the Ideal Toy company, who was willing to help market the product. The product was an immediate hit, and during the 1980s, over 200 million cubes were sold. Around 1983, the frenzied popularity of the cube began to wane and sales slowed drastically. It remained in small scale production until Seven Towns took over the marketing, and licensed the Rubik Cube to the Oddzon Company for the United States market in 1995. Since that time sales have steadily increased to over 500,000 units a year.
The quality of the individual parts are also inspected just after exiting the mold. Since thousands of parts are made daily, a complete inspection would be difficult. Consequently, line inspectors may randomly check the plastic parts at fixed time intervals and check to ensure they meet size, shape, and consistency specifications. This sampling method provides a good indication of the quality of the overall Rubik's cube production run. Things that are looked for include deformed parts, improperly fitted parts and inappropriate labeling. While visual inspection is the primary test method employed, more rigorous measurements may also be performed. Measuring equipment is used to check the length, width, and thickness of each part. Typically, devices such as a vernier caliper, a micrometer, or a microscope are used. Just prior to putting a cube in the packaging it may be twisted to ensure that it holds together and is in proper working order. This can be done by hand or by a turning machine. If a toy is found to be defective it is placed aside to be reworked later.
The Rubik's cube (sometimes misspelled rubix cube) is a mechanical 3D puzzle, invented more than 30 years ago and still considered as the best-selling toy of all times! Yet, solving the Rubik's Cube is considered a nearly-impossible task, which requires an IQ of 160... Is that really so hard? Definitely not!! Just follow this simple step by step solving guide and you'll shortly find out that you can solve the Rubik's cube as well… Let's get to work! Rubix Build
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