The Rubik's "Build It Solve It" kit comes with all the parts necessary to build your own Rubik's cube. Easy "how to" instructions, plastic cube pieces and tiles (including some spares), center core pieces, metal screws, springs and screwdriver - all organized in a handy storage tray. Once you've built your cube, turn to the "you can do the Rubik's cube" booklet and learn how to solve it! By learning how to build your own Rubik's cube, you will greatly improve your understanding of how this fascinating puzzle functions, literally from the inside out.
Building the Rubik's Cube is pretty easy to do. It took us about 15 minutes, and the instructions were fairly easy to follow. Make sure you pay attention to where you are supposed to place the colored tiles because if you snap them on in the wrong place, you can't remove them. You'll still be able to use your Rubik's Cube, but you won't be able to follow along in the solution guide.
Assembling the Rubik’s Cube is a wonderful way to exercise your fine motor skills. And improve the spatial and visual perception and cognitive thinking in children. Once you have the cube put together, it will challenge the children to use their visual and spatial perception skills. The cube will also help children to learn about different colors and how to match them. Check it out here at amazon.com.                

The individual pieces that make up the Rubik's cube are typically produced from plastic. Plastics are high molecular weight materials that can be produced through various chemical reactions called polymerization. Most of the plastics used in a Rubik's cube are thermoplastics. These compounds are rigid, durable, and can be permanently molded into various shapes. The plastics used in the Rubik's cube are acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and nylon. Other plastics that might be used include polypropylene (PP), high impact polystyrene (HIPS), and high density polyethylene (HDPE).
Puzzle makers have been creating problems for people to solve for centuries. Some of the earliest puzzles date back to the time of the ancient Greeks and Romans. The Chinese have a ring puzzle that is thought to have been developed during the second century A.D. This was first described by Italian mathematician Girolamo Carolano (Cardan) in 1550. When the printing press was invented, complete books of mathematical and mechanical problems designed specifically for recreation were circulated. Rubix Build
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