Just because this kit gives you a behind-the-scenes look as to how a Rubik's Cube is made along with tips for how to solve it doesn't mean that you'll be solving it like a pro within seconds. Even the solution booklet itself says that the first step will take practice and trial by error. So this is definitely going to be more fun for kids or adults who enjoy the puzzlement of a Rubik's Cube and have the patience to build it and practice using the solving tips. But once you finally do solve it, you'll be pretty proud of yourself, and your friends and family will be impressed.
The Rubik’s Build It, Solve It kit is for one player.  Although ages 8 and up are recommended, I believe younger children will enjoy playing with the assembled toy.  As we said before, it is great for children and adults that don’t mind trying to figure out how the cube works – it’s great for those that enjoy putting puzzles together. The kit gives an inside look on how the cube works and how it is put together. Plus, you will receive some tips in the instruction manual on how to solve it.
When you get round to building the Rubik’s Cube, you will find it is not as hard as it appears.  The instructions are quite easy to follow and it will probably take you about fifteen minutes. When you get round to placing the colored tiles, pay attention to where they are supposed to go. Because once you snap them into place. you will not be able to remove them. Having said that. you can still use the Rubik’s Cube. What you will not be able to do is follow the instruction guide and solve the puzzle.
The Rubik’s cube has recently begun making a comeback. Invented in 1974, it is the world’s best-selling toy. But solving them takes thought, effort, and skill . . . so why not let a robot do it? In this project, we take a Raspberry Pi, a BrickPi, and a set of LEGO Mindstorms and build a Rubik’s cube solving robot. Simply place an unsolved Rubik’s cube in the solver, run the python program, and your Rubik’s cube is solved!
The project uses the Pi to directly solve the Rubik’s cube. The BrickPi3 takes the unsolved Rubik’s cube and the Raspberry Pi takes a picture of each side of the Rubik’s cube with the Raspberry Pi Camera. The Pi creates a text map of the color squares that shows where they are located on the cube. When it has fully mapped the cube, the Pi uses the “kociemba” python library to map out the moves needed to solve the Rubik’s cube. This information is taken by the Pi and BrickPi3 to solve the Rubik’s cube using the LEGO motors. The result: a solved Rubik’s cube. Rubiks Build It Solve It
Just because this kit gives you a behind-the-scenes look as to how a Rubik's Cube is made along with tips for how to solve it doesn't mean that you'll be solving it like a pro within seconds. Even the solution booklet itself says that the first step will take practice and trial by error. So this is definitely going to be more fun for kids or adults who enjoy the puzzlement of a Rubik's Cube and have the patience to build it and practice using the solving tips. But once you finally do solve it, you'll be pretty proud of yourself, and your friends and family will be impressed. Rubix Builders
Now you need to orient these pieces. Refer to the next picture. As you can see, the orange piece matches the orange centre. Look at the edges on your puzzle. You could have none matching, two matching or all matching. If you have all four edges matching the centres, your cross is solved. If you have none matching, perform a U move, then look around the cube again. You want to have at least two matching. If none of them match, do another U move. Repeat until you have either two or four edges matching their centres.
The project uses the Pi to directly solve the Rubik’s cube. The BrickPi3 takes the unsolved Rubik’s cube and the Raspberry Pi takes a picture of each side of the Rubik’s cube with the Raspberry Pi Camera. The Pi creates a text map of the color squares that shows where they are located on the cube. When it has fully mapped the cube, the Pi uses the “kociemba” python library to map out the moves needed to solve the Rubik’s cube. This information is taken by the Pi and BrickPi3 to solve the Rubik’s cube using the LEGO motors. The result: a solved Rubik’s cube. Rubiks Build It Solve It
The standard Rubik's cube has sides of about 2.2 in (5.7 cm) per square. Various other sizes have also been produced such as a 1.5 in (3.8 cm) mini cube, a 0.8 in (2 cm) key chain micro cube, and a 3.5 in (9 cm) giant cube. While the standard cube is a 3 × 3 × 3 segmentation other types have also been introduced. Some of the more interesting ones include the 2 × 2 × 2 cube, the 4 × 4 × 4 cube (called Rubik's Revenge) and the 5 × 5 × 5 cube. The shape has also been varied and puzzles in the form of a tetrahedral, a pyramid, and an octahedral are among types that were produced. The Rubik's cube also led to the development of game derivatives like the Rubik's cube puzzle and the Rub it cube eraser. Rubix Building Solutions

Dreamt up by cuber Daniel Stabile who posted a demonstration to YouTube and a how-to to Instructables, the paper cube is fully-functional if not particularly easy to use. On top of that, assembly will likely take you a while, but it will also teach about how the insides of these cubes—speedy and slow alike—actually function mechanically. In a video showing off the creations, Stabile demonstrates his first attempt, as well as a better-looking second version:
Keeping white on top, turn the cube so that a different colour face is toward you. Follow the above instructions again. Repeat with the other two faces until the white cross is complete. This step is quite intuitive; you can do it for sure but it does take a little practice. Just move the white edges to their places not messing up the ones already fixed.  
Rubik's cube is a toy puzzle designed by Erno Rubik during the mid-1970s. It is a cube-shaped device made up of smaller cube pieces with six faces having differing colors. The primary method of manufacture involves injection molding of the various component pieces, then subsequent assembly, labeling, and packaging. The cube was extremely popular during the 1980s, and at its peak between 1980 and 1983, 200 million cubes were sold world wide. Today sales continue to be over 500,000 cubes sold world wide each year. Rubiks Build It Solve It Review
When you eventually get the desired position, there are two slightly different variations of it. For this, we need to look at the front of the cube. The yellow corner facing the front can be  in two positions: Either facing the front, or facing the right. In the first image, it is facing the front. This shows you have Sune. To solve it, just do the above algorithm one more time, and you should have oriented all of the top layer.

This Rubik’s Build It, Solve It kit is for one player – it is recommended for ages 8 and up. As we said before, it is great for children and adults that don’t mind trying to figure out how the cube works – it’s great for those that enjoy putting puzzles together. This kit right here is going to give an inside look on how the cube works and how it’s put together. Plus, you’ll receive some tips in the instruction manual on how to solve it.
If you were around in the 1980’s and did not live under a rock, you had a Rubik’s cube.  It was the 3D combination puzzle that had children and adults mesmerized trying to solve the impossible puzzle.  We would spend hours twisting and turning the cube to figure the solution. The cube was invented by an Hungarian professor of architecture, Erno Rubik, in 1974.  Although it took Erno over one month to solve his very own puzzle, it  became a fad and everyone had one. Consequently, it became the world’s best selling toy ever at that time.

The Rubik's cube appears to be made up of 26 smaller cubes. In its solved state, it has six faces, each made up of nine small square faces of the same color. While it appears that all of the small faces can be moved, only the corners and edges can actually move. The center cubes are each fixed and only rotate in place. When the cube is taken apart it can be seen that the center cubes are each connected by axles to an inner core. The corners and edges are not fixed to anything. This allows them to move around the center cubes. The cube maintains its shape because the corners and edges hold each other in place and are retained by the center cubes. Each piece has an internal tab that is retained by the center cubes and trapped by the surrounding pieces. These tabs are shaped to fit along a curved track that is created by the backs of the other pieces. The central cubes are fixed with a spring and rivet and retain all the surrounding pieces. The spring exerts just the right pressure to hold all the pieces in place while giving enough flexibility for a smooth and forgiving function.

If you're reading this, you're probably holding a cube in your hand and already feeling bad about yourself for needing to look up the solution. But don't worry! In fact, most of the “super-human-intelligence beings” (a common misconception) who have solved the cube thousands of times in their lifetimes were sitting as you are now. Whether you want to learn it to impress a girl, because your friends bet you couldn't, or just to close the book on the biggest time waste of your childhood by finally defeating it, this guide will take you through the simplest way to conquer the puzzle.

You can find assembly instructions for the BrickPi3 here. We will need to assemble the case, attach the BrickPi3, the Raspberry Pi, the Raspberry Pi Camera, add an SD Card, and add batteries.  To make the software easier to setup, Raspbian for Robots comes with most of the software you will need already setup.  You will need at least an 8 GB SD Card, and you will want to expand the disk to fit the full size of the SD Card. Rubix Builders
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