Simply put the 1x1x3 is a pseudo puzzle, It fills a gap in the collection but its not exactly complicated to solve. The way this puzzle was made was by using two centres and a core of a QiYi Sail. As these parts already spin like a 1x1x3 should all I had to do was make these parts into cubies by adding some apoxie sculpt and sanding them smooth. This puzzle was made in an afternoon and stickered the following morning while I was also building my 'Mefferts bandage cube'.
Your goal is to have all four edges matching their centres. If you have this, then the cross is solved. If you have only two, then you could have one of two cases. Either the two matching edges are adjacent (next to each other) or opposite each other. If they are adjacent, hold the cube so that the two solved pieces are facing the front and left of the cube (shown in the left picture), then perform: Rubiks Build It Solve It Review
For decorative purposes, a colorant is typically added to the plastic. The pieces of a Rubik's cube are typically black. During production, colored stickers are put on the outside of the cube to denote the color of a side. The plastics that are used during production are supplied to the manufacturer in a pellet form complete with the filler and colorants. These pellets can then be loaded into the molding machines directly.

Assembling the Rubik’s Cube is a wonderful way to exercise your fine motor skills. And improve the spatial and visual perception and cognitive thinking in children. Once you have the cube put together, it will challenge the children to use their visual and spatial perception skills. The cube will also help children to learn about different colors and how to match them. Check it out here at amazon.com.                 Rubix Builders
Dreamt up by cuber Daniel Stabile who posted a demonstration to YouTube and a how-to to Instructables, the paper cube is fully-functional if not particularly easy to use. On top of that, assembly will likely take you a while, but it will also teach about how the insides of these cubes—speedy and slow alike—actually function mechanically. In a video showing off the creations, Stabile demonstrates his first attempt, as well as a better-looking second version: Rubiks Build It Solve It
The Rubik’s cube has recently begun making a comeback. Invented in 1974, it is the world’s best-selling toy. But solving them takes thought, effort, and skill . . . so why not let a robot do it? In this project, we take a Raspberry Pi, a BrickPi, and a set of LEGO Mindstorms and build a Rubik’s cube solving robot. Simply place an unsolved Rubik’s cube in the solver, run the python program, and your Rubik’s cube is solved! 

Build A Rubix Cube


Puzzle makers have been creating problems for people to solve for centuries. Some of the earliest puzzles date back to the time of the ancient Greeks and Romans. The Chinese have a ring puzzle that is thought to have been developed during the second century A.D. This was first described by Italian mathematician Girolamo Carolano (Cardan) in 1550. When the printing press was invented, complete books of mathematical and mechanical problems designed specifically for recreation were circulated. Rubix Build
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