Rubik’s Build It, Solve It is similar to the conventional Rubik’s block, but with a twist. This block includes each the tools, bits and directions kids need to be able to construct a Rubik’s Cube of the own. After this block was assembled together, there’s an education booklet (it’s’s 10-pages in duration) which will direct you through the procedure for solving the Rubik’s Cube (eventually). Here, you’ll find everything from identifying the areas of the block to solving fundamental puzzles. With this toy, kids will be provided a slow and continuous introduction about the best way best to use the block and progress to harder struggles. Rubix Build
Do you remember those complicated little Rubik’s block that we would sit there trying to figure out for what seems like hours? Did any of you guys/girls ever solve them? Maybe all it takes for us to solve the “cube” would be for us to see what it’s all about. While there are many mesmerizing toys that are about to emerge into our world, today, we would like to take a close look at the Rubik’s Build It, Solve It, because we believe this is the one-way ticket to finally solving the cube! Rubix Building Solutions
If you're still reading, congratulations on not being put off by the time requirements! The first thing you are going to need to know about solving the cube is how the turns you make can be represented by letters. Later on in this guide, you're going to need a few algorithms. These are combinations of moves that rotate pieces or just move them around to get them where you want them. These algorithms are written using this notation, so you can always come back to this section if you've forgotten by the time we need them. Rubiks Build It Solve It Instructions

The Rubik's cube (sometimes misspelled rubix cube) is a mechanical 3D puzzle, invented more than 30 years ago and still considered as the best-selling toy of all times! Yet, solving the Rubik's Cube is considered a nearly-impossible task, which requires an IQ of 160... Is that really so hard? Definitely not!! Just follow this simple step by step solving guide and you'll shortly find out that you can solve the Rubik's cube as well… Let's get to work!
The Rubik's cube appears to be made up of 26 smaller cubes. In its solved state, it has six faces, each made up of nine small square faces of the same color. While it appears that all of the small faces can be moved, only the corners and edges can actually move. The center cubes are each fixed and only rotate in place. When the cube is taken apart it can be seen that the center cubes are each connected by axles to an inner core. The corners and edges are not fixed to anything. This allows them to move around the center cubes. The cube maintains its shape because the corners and edges hold each other in place and are retained by the center cubes. Each piece has an internal tab that is retained by the center cubes and trapped by the surrounding pieces. These tabs are shaped to fit along a curved track that is created by the backs of the other pieces. The central cubes are fixed with a spring and rivet and retain all the surrounding pieces. The spring exerts just the right pressure to hold all the pieces in place while giving enough flexibility for a smooth and forgiving function.
There are many approaches on how to solve the Rubik's Cube. All these methods have different levels of difficulties, for speedcubers or beginners, even for solving the cube blindfolded. People usually get stuck solving the cube after completing the first face, after that they need some help. In the following article I'm going to show you the easiest way to solve the cube using the beginner's method.
Keeping white on top, turn the cube so that a different colour face is toward you. Follow the above instructions again. Repeat with the other two faces until the white cross is complete. This step is quite intuitive; you can do it for sure but it does take a little practice. Just move the white edges to their places not messing up the ones already fixed.  

Puzzle makers have been creating problems for people to solve for centuries. Some of the earliest puzzles date back to the time of the ancient Greeks and Romans. The Chinese have a ring puzzle that is thought to have been developed during the second century A.D. This was first described by Italian mathematician Girolamo Carolano (Cardan) in 1550. When the printing press was invented, complete books of mathematical and mechanical problems designed specifically for recreation were circulated. Rubix Build
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