Erno Rubik, an architect and professor at the University of Budapest developed the first working prototype of the Rubik's cube in 1974. He received a Hungarian patent in 1975. Apparently, it was also independently designed by Terutoshi Ishige, an engineer from Japan, who received a Japanese patent in 1976. Professor Rubik created the cube as a teaching aid for his students to help them recognize three-dimensional spatial relationships. When he showed the working prototype to his students, it was an immediate hit.

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Begin with your cube solved. Once again, you want to start off with your Rubik’s cube in its solved position. Making a fish pattern on your Rubik’s cube is simple. The end result will have swapped two edge pieces so that the remaining ones look like a fish with fins. If you hold the cube diagonally it will look like a fish swimming away from you.[7]

The standard Rubik's cube has sides of about 2.2 in (5.7 cm) per square. Various other sizes have also been produced such as a 1.5 in (3.8 cm) mini cube, a 0.8 in (2 cm) key chain micro cube, and a 3.5 in (9 cm) giant cube. While the standard cube is a 3 × 3 × 3 segmentation other types have also been introduced. Some of the more interesting ones include the 2 × 2 × 2 cube, the 4 × 4 × 4 cube (called Rubik's Revenge) and the 5 × 5 × 5 cube. The shape has also been varied and puzzles in the form of a tetrahedral, a pyramid, and an octahedral are among types that were produced. The Rubik's cube also led to the development of game derivatives like the Rubik's cube puzzle and the Rub it cube eraser.
An important thing to note is that this task is not a light one. It may require several hours of attempts. If you'd rather just solve the cube in your hand and forget about it rather than being able to solve any cube you're given, there are plenty of solvers available on the web. However, the satisfaction of holding a completed Rubik's Cube in your hand and thinking “I did that, and I can do it again” is greater than most, mainly due to the fact that the puzzle has been present in all our lives at some point. By the mid 1980's, an estimated fifth of the world's population had attempted to solve the cube. If you want to stand out and say that you can defeat the puzzle, time and determination is a large factor.
The Rubik's cube appears to be made up of 26 smaller cubes. In its solved state, it has six faces, each made up of nine small square faces of the same color. While it appears that all of the small faces can be moved, only the corners and edges can actually move. The center cubes are each fixed and only rotate in place. When the cube is taken apart it can be seen that the center cubes are each connected by axles to an inner core. The corners and edges are not fixed to anything. This allows them to move around the center cubes. The cube maintains its shape because the corners and edges hold each other in place and are retained by the center cubes. Each piece has an internal tab that is retained by the center cubes and trapped by the surrounding pieces. These tabs are shaped to fit along a curved track that is created by the backs of the other pieces. The central cubes are fixed with a spring and rivet and retain all the surrounding pieces. The spring exerts just the right pressure to hold all the pieces in place while giving enough flexibility for a smooth and forgiving function. Rubiks Build It Solve It
When it comes to building the Rubik’s Cube, it’s not as hard as it looks. In all actuality, it will take about fifteen minutes and the instructions are easy to follow. When it comes to placing the colored tiles, make sure you pay attention to where you’re supposed to place them, because if you snap them in the wrong place, you won’t be able to remove them. Yes, you will still be able to use the Rubik’s Cube, but you won’t be able to follow along with the instruction guide on solving the puzzle.
Maybe all it takes to solve a Rubik's Cube is to see how one is made, and that's what kids get to do with the Rubik's Build It, Solve It kit. It comes with all the pieces, tools, and instructions kids need to build their very own Rubik's Cube. Once built, there is a 10-page instruction booklet that guides kids through solving a Rubik's Cube. From identifying the parts of a Rubik's Cube to solving basic Rubik's puzzles, kids are given a slow introduction on how to use their Rubik's Cube and progress to harder and harder challenges.

product description Blow your mom's mind when you build and solve the Rubik's Build It Solve It Puzzle. With all of the parts necessary for construction along with easy to follow instructions, you can learn how to solve it from the inside out. Put it together, twist it up and use your new found knowledge to make short work of one of life's most beloved puzzles - Rubik's®.
The project uses the Pi to directly solve the Rubik’s cube. The BrickPi3 takes the unsolved Rubik’s cube and the Raspberry Pi takes a picture of each side of the Rubik’s cube with the Raspberry Pi Camera. The Pi creates a text map of the color squares that shows where they are located on the cube. When it has fully mapped the cube, the Pi uses the “kociemba” python library to map out the moves needed to solve the Rubik’s cube. This information is taken by the Pi and BrickPi3 to solve the Rubik’s cube using the LEGO motors. The result: a solved Rubik’s cube. Rubix Building Solutions
The manufacture of the first Rubik's cube prototypes was by hand. During the late 1970s, methods for mass production were developed and continue to be used today. Typically, production is a step by step process that involves injection molding of the pieces, fitting the pieces together, decorating the Rubik's cube, and putting the finished product in packaging. Rubix Building Products
The robot will turn the cube to each face and the camera will take 6 pictures, one of each side of the Cube.  The Raspberry Pi will determine the cube configuration from the six pictures. The Cube configuration will be passed to the kociemba Python library to find an efficient solution. Finally, the robot will execute the moves to solve the Rubik’s Cube!

The Rubik's cube appears to be made up of 26 smaller cubes. In its solved state, it has six faces, each made up of nine small square faces of the same color. While it appears that all of the small faces can be moved, only the corners and edges can actually move. The center cubes are each fixed and only rotate in place. When the cube is taken apart it can be seen that the center cubes are each connected by axles to an inner core. The corners and edges are not fixed to anything. This allows them to move around the center cubes. The cube maintains its shape because the corners and edges hold each other in place and are retained by the center cubes. Each piece has an internal tab that is retained by the center cubes and trapped by the surrounding pieces. These tabs are shaped to fit along a curved track that is created by the backs of the other pieces. The central cubes are fixed with a spring and rivet and retain all the surrounding pieces. The spring exerts just the right pressure to hold all the pieces in place while giving enough flexibility for a smooth and forgiving function. Rubiks Build It Solve It
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