Hi, your aluminum cube is beautiful. My 6 yr old son has asked me to help him make a cube. So I went to the Home Depot today and looked around the plumbing and hardware sections. I only found some PVC pipe attachments but nothing with 6 knobs. I also found some nuts and bolts but I don't know which kind to get. Could you give me some idea of what to buy? I don't have very many tools at home but I do have a drill if I needed to drill through the PVC pipe and copper pipe cutters if I needed to use metal piping. Please help.

The Rubik’s Build It, Solve It kit is for one player.  Although ages 8 and up are recommended, I believe younger children will enjoy playing with the assembled toy.  As we said before, it is great for children and adults that don’t mind trying to figure out how the cube works – it’s great for those that enjoy putting puzzles together. The kit gives an inside look on how the cube works and how it is put together. Plus, you will receive some tips in the instruction manual on how to solve it.
Your goal is to have all four edges matching their centres. If you have this, then the cross is solved. If you have only two, then you could have one of two cases. Either the two matching edges are adjacent (next to each other) or opposite each other. If they are adjacent, hold the cube so that the two solved pieces are facing the front and left of the cube (shown in the left picture), then perform:
recently made a significant come back. This has been a result of impressive marketing efforts by Seven Towns. In the future, this marketing effort should continue to increase sales of the Rubik's cube. In addition to the cube, other derivative puzzles have been introduced including the Rubik's snake, Rubik's triamid, and the Rubik's magic folding puzzle. It is expected that new variants will also be introduced in the near future.
Dreamt up by cuber Daniel Stabile who posted a demonstration to YouTube and a how-to to Instructables, the paper cube is fully-functional if not particularly easy to use. On top of that, assembly will likely take you a while, but it will also teach about how the insides of these cubes—speedy and slow alike—actually function mechanically. In a video showing off the creations, Stabile demonstrates his first attempt, as well as a better-looking second version: Rubiks Build It Solve It

The centre pieces on each face, as you may have noticed from playing around with the cube, can't be moved to another spot, only rotated. So we can use this to our advantage by building around the centres. The best centre to build your first cross around is the white centre, as many guides and resources on the web start with a white face, so if you need to look up some steps and examples elsewhere, your cube will look similar to the one that is being used in other demonstrations.
For decorative purposes, a colorant is typically added to the plastic. The pieces of a Rubik's cube are typically black. During production, colored stickers are put on the outside of the cube to denote the color of a side. The plastics that are used during production are supplied to the manufacturer in a pellet form complete with the filler and colorants. These pellets can then be loaded into the molding machines directly.
The quality of the individual parts are also inspected just after exiting the mold. Since thousands of parts are made daily, a complete inspection would be difficult. Consequently, line inspectors may randomly check the plastic parts at fixed time intervals and check to ensure they meet size, shape, and consistency specifications. This sampling method provides a good indication of the quality of the overall Rubik's cube production run. Things that are looked for include deformed parts, improperly fitted parts and inappropriate labeling. While visual inspection is the primary test method employed, more rigorous measurements may also be performed. Measuring equipment is used to check the length, width, and thickness of each part. Typically, devices such as a vernier caliper, a micrometer, or a microscope are used. Just prior to putting a cube in the packaging it may be twisted to ensure that it holds together and is in proper working order. This can be done by hand or by a turning machine. If a toy is found to be defective it is placed aside to be reworked later.
There are 5 different positions your cube can be in now, one of which could be solved. The rest of them have all four corners solved, so do the required amount of U moves so that every corner is in its right place. 2 of the 4 remaining possibilities have a solved bar (as mentioned above, where all three colours on that side are the same), and the other 2 have no solved bars.
The project uses the Pi to directly solve the Rubik’s cube. The BrickPi3 takes the unsolved Rubik’s cube and the Raspberry Pi takes a picture of each side of the Rubik’s cube with the Raspberry Pi Camera. The Pi creates a text map of the color squares that shows where they are located on the cube. When it has fully mapped the cube, the Pi uses the “kociemba” python library to map out the moves needed to solve the Rubik’s cube. This information is taken by the Pi and BrickPi3 to solve the Rubik’s cube using the LEGO motors. The result: a solved Rubik’s cube. Rubiks Build It Solve It
Important! The center pieces are part of the core and subsequently cannot move relatively to each other. For that reason they are already "solved". The solving process is actually bringing all corner and edge pieces to the "already solved" center pieces (meaning there are only 20 pieces to solve out of the 26). For example, the blue center piece will always be opposite to the green center piece (on a standard color-scheme cube). It doesn't matter how hard you will try scrambling the cube, it will just stay that way.
Your goal is to have all four edges matching their centres. If you have this, then the cross is solved. If you have only two, then you could have one of two cases. Either the two matching edges are adjacent (next to each other) or opposite each other. If they are adjacent, hold the cube so that the two solved pieces are facing the front and left of the cube (shown in the left picture), then perform:
Important! The center pieces are part of the core and subsequently cannot move relatively to each other. For that reason they are already "solved". The solving process is actually bringing all corner and edge pieces to the "already solved" center pieces (meaning there are only 20 pieces to solve out of the 26). For example, the blue center piece will always be opposite to the green center piece (on a standard color-scheme cube). It doesn't matter how hard you will try scrambling the cube, it will just stay that way.
An important thing to note is that this task is not a light one. It may require several hours of attempts. If you'd rather just solve the cube in your hand and forget about it rather than being able to solve any cube you're given, there are plenty of solvers available on the web. However, the satisfaction of holding a completed Rubik's Cube in your hand and thinking “I did that, and I can do it again” is greater than most, mainly due to the fact that the puzzle has been present in all our lives at some point. By the mid 1980's, an estimated fifth of the world's population had attempted to solve the cube. If you want to stand out and say that you can defeat the puzzle, time and determination is a large factor.
If there are no more edges left on the top layer, then they are probably either inserted in the right place but flipped, or inserted in the wrong place. To get an edge out of somewhere it shouldn't be, just insert one of the yellow edges into that slot. This should get the edge out and on the top layer, ready for you to use the above instructions to insert correctly. Rubix Build
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