The standard Rubik's cube has sides of about 2.2 in (5.7 cm) per square. Various other sizes have also been produced such as a 1.5 in (3.8 cm) mini cube, a 0.8 in (2 cm) key chain micro cube, and a 3.5 in (9 cm) giant cube. While the standard cube is a 3 × 3 × 3 segmentation other types have also been introduced. Some of the more interesting ones include the 2 × 2 × 2 cube, the 4 × 4 × 4 cube (called Rubik's Revenge) and the 5 × 5 × 5 cube. The shape has also been varied and puzzles in the form of a tetrahedral, a pyramid, and an octahedral are among types that were produced. The Rubik's cube also led to the development of game derivatives like the Rubik's cube puzzle and the Rub it cube eraser. Rubix Building Solutions

Puzzle makers have been creating problems for people to solve for centuries. Some of the earliest puzzles date back to the time of the ancient Greeks and Romans. The Chinese have a ring puzzle that is thought to have been developed during the second century A.D. This was first described by Italian mathematician Girolamo Carolano (Cardan) in 1550. When the printing press was invented, complete books of mathematical and mechanical problems designed specifically for recreation were circulated.
Okay, we’re going to be honest with you – you know how aggravating the traditional Rubik’s Cube is, correct? If you’ve ever tried to solve one, you probably know exactly what we’re talking about here. Yes, this kit offers a behind-the-scenes look and even comes with a 10-page instruction manual, but this doesn’t necessarily mean you will be solving the puzzle like a professional within seconds. Rubix Building Solutions

Dreamt up by cuber Daniel Stabile who posted a demonstration to YouTube and a how-to to Instructables, the paper cube is fully-functional if not particularly easy to use. On top of that, assembly will likely take you a while, but it will also teach about how the insides of these cubes—speedy and slow alike—actually function mechanically. In a video showing off the creations, Stabile demonstrates his first attempt, as well as a better-looking second version:

Over the next few years, Rubik worked with a manufacturer to allow production of the cube on a mass scale. After three years of development, the first cubes were available on toy store shelves in Budapest. While the cube remained popular in Hungry, the political atmosphere of the time made it difficult for it to be introduced in the United States. The two men who were most responsible for making the cube an international success were Dr. Laczi Tibor and Tom Kremer of Seven Towns Ltd., London. Seven Towns licensed the Rubik Cube invention from Professor Rubik for worldwide distribution. Dr. Tibor worked within Hungry to convince bureaucrats to allow the technology out of the country. Kremer found a United States toy maker, the Ideal Toy company, who was willing to help market the product. The product was an immediate hit, and during the 1980s, over 200 million cubes were sold. Around 1983, the frenzied popularity of the cube began to wane and sales slowed drastically. It remained in small scale production until Seven Towns took over the marketing, and licensed the Rubik Cube to the Oddzon Company for the United States market in 1995. Since that time sales have steadily increased to over 500,000 units a year.
There are various puzzles that involve colored square tiles and colored cubes. Some early precursors to the Rubik's cube include devices such as the Katzenjammer and the Mayblox puzzle. The Mayblox puzzle was created by British mathematician Percy MacMahon in the early 1920s. In the 1960s, Parker Bothers introduced another cube puzzle type toy called Instant Insanity. This toy achieved a moderate level of popularity in the United States. The early 1970s brought with it a device called the Pyraminx, which was invented by Uwe Meffert. This toy was a pyramid that had movable pieces that were to be lined up according to color.

Rubiks Build It


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Since the center pieces cannot be moved relatively to each other it's important to solve the edge pieces correctly in relation to each other. For example, when solving the white in our case- the green center piece is to the left of the red center piece, therefore the green-white edge piece should to be solved to the left of the red-white edge piece (see image).
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Since the center pieces cannot be moved relatively to each other it's important to solve the edge pieces correctly in relation to each other. For example, when solving the white in our case- the green center piece is to the left of the red center piece, therefore the green-white edge piece should to be solved to the left of the red-white edge piece (see image).
Twist the bottom layer so that one of the white corners is directly under the spot where it's supposed to go on the top layer. Now, do one of the three algorithms according to the orientation of the piece, aka. in which direction the white sticker is facing. If the white corner piece is where it belongs but turned wrong then first you have to pop it out.

If it comes to constructing the Rubik’s Cube, it’s not as difficult as it seems. In reality, it is going to take approximately fifteen minutes and the directions are simple to follow. If it comes to putting the coloured tiles, be sure to look closely at where you’re supposed to put them since in the event that you snap them in the incorrect location, you won’t have the ability to eliminate them. Yes, you will continue to have the ability to use this Rubik’s Cube, however you won’t be able to follow along with the documentation manual on solving the mystery.
The Rubik’s Build It, Solve It kit is for one player.  Although ages 8 and up are recommended, I believe younger children will enjoy playing with the assembled toy.  As we said before, it is great for children and adults that don’t mind trying to figure out how the cube works – it’s great for those that enjoy putting puzzles together. The kit gives an inside look on how the cube works and how it is put together. Plus, you will receive some tips in the instruction manual on how to solve it.
Okay, we’re going to be honest with you – you know how aggravating the traditional Rubik’s Cube is, correct? If you’ve ever tried to solve one, you probably know exactly what we’re talking about here. Yes, this kit offers a behind-the-scenes look and even comes with a 10-page instruction manual, but this doesn’t necessarily mean you will be solving the puzzle like a professional within seconds. Rubix Building Solutions

Keeping white on top, turn the cube so that a different colour face is toward you. Follow the above instructions again. Repeat with the other two faces until the white cross is complete. This step is quite intuitive; you can do it for sure but it does take a little practice. Just move the white edges to their places not messing up the ones already fixed.  
Simply put the 1x1x3 is a pseudo puzzle, It fills a gap in the collection but its not exactly complicated to solve. The way this puzzle was made was by using two centres and a core of a QiYi Sail. As these parts already spin like a 1x1x3 should all I had to do was make these parts into cubies by adding some apoxie sculpt and sanding them smooth. This puzzle was made in an afternoon and stickered the following morning while I was also building my 'Mefferts bandage cube'.
When you eventually get the desired position, there are two slightly different variations of it. For this, we need to look at the front of the cube. The yellow corner facing the front can be  in two positions: Either facing the front, or facing the right. In the first image, it is facing the front. This shows you have Sune. To solve it, just do the above algorithm one more time, and you should have oriented all of the top layer.

Your goal is to have all four edges matching their centres. If you have this, then the cross is solved. If you have only two, then you could have one of two cases. Either the two matching edges are adjacent (next to each other) or opposite each other. If they are adjacent, hold the cube so that the two solved pieces are facing the front and left of the cube (shown in the left picture), then perform: Rubiks Build It Solve It

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