The project uses the Pi to directly solve the Rubik’s cube. The BrickPi3 takes the unsolved Rubik’s cube and the Raspberry Pi takes a picture of each side of the Rubik’s cube with the Raspberry Pi Camera. The Pi creates a text map of the color squares that shows where they are located on the cube. When it has fully mapped the cube, the Pi uses the “kociemba” python library to map out the moves needed to solve the Rubik’s cube. This information is taken by the Pi and BrickPi3 to solve the Rubik’s cube using the LEGO motors. The result: a solved Rubik’s cube. Rubiks Build It Solve It

If you were around in the 1980’s and did not live under a rock, you had a Rubik’s cube.  It was the 3D combination puzzle that had children and adults mesmerized trying to solve the impossible puzzle.  We would spend hours twisting and turning the cube to figure the solution. The cube was invented by an Hungarian professor of architecture, Erno Rubik, in 1974.  Although it took Erno over one month to solve his very own puzzle, it  became a fad and everyone had one. Consequently, it became the world’s best selling toy ever at that time. Rubiks Build It Solve It Instructions


Begin with your cube solved. Once again, you want to start off with your Rubik’s cube in its solved position. Making a fish pattern on your Rubik’s cube is simple. The end result will have swapped two edge pieces so that the remaining ones look like a fish with fins. If you hold the cube diagonally it will look like a fish swimming away from you.[7]
4 Next, the Rubik's cube faces need to be labeled. The labels are made from sheet polypropylene material that is printed with the colors. The printed sheet PP is then laminated with a clear PP protective covering. The material is then die cut with the labels wound onto rolls. The labels are made with all nine squares of each face exactly aligned. This way the labels can be perfectly aligned when they are applied to the cube.
Your goal is to have all four edges matching their centres. If you have this, then the cross is solved. If you have only two, then you could have one of two cases. Either the two matching edges are adjacent (next to each other) or opposite each other. If they are adjacent, hold the cube so that the two solved pieces are facing the front and left of the cube (shown in the left picture), then perform: Rubiks Build It Solve It Review
Now you need to orient these pieces. Refer to the next picture. As you can see, the orange piece matches the orange centre. Look at the edges on your puzzle. You could have none matching, two matching or all matching. If you have all four edges matching the centres, your cross is solved. If you have none matching, perform a U move, then look around the cube again. You want to have at least two matching. If none of them match, do another U move. Repeat until you have either two or four edges matching their centres.

Just because this kit gives you a behind-the-scenes look as to how a Rubik's Cube is made along with tips for how to solve it doesn't mean that you'll be solving it like a pro within seconds. Even the solution booklet itself says that the first step will take practice and trial by error. So this is definitely going to be more fun for kids or adults who enjoy the puzzlement of a Rubik's Cube and have the patience to build it and practice using the solving tips. But once you finally do solve it, you'll be pretty proud of yourself, and your friends and family will be impressed.
From these early riddles and word problems, toy puzzles were naturally developed. In 1857, the Irish mathematician Sir William Hamilton invented the Icosian puzzle. Sometime around 1870, the famous 15 Puzzle was introduced, reportedly by Sam Lloyd. This puzzle involved numerical tiles that had to be placed in order and became extremely popular in the early twentieth century. In 1883, French mathematician Edouard Lucas created the Tower of Hanoi puzzle. This puzzle was made up of three pegs and a number of discs with different sizes. The goal was to place the discs on the pegs in the correct order.
The individual pieces that make up the Rubik's cube are typically produced from plastic. Plastics are high molecular weight materials that can be produced through various chemical reactions called polymerization. Most of the plastics used in a Rubik's cube are thermoplastics. These compounds are rigid, durable, and can be permanently molded into various shapes. The plastics used in the Rubik's cube are acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and nylon. Other plastics that might be used include polypropylene (PP), high impact polystyrene (HIPS), and high density polyethylene (HDPE).

Finally, we add a camera arm.  In the original design by MindCubr, this held the EV3 color sensor over the Rubik’s cube.  In our modified design, it holds a Raspberry Pi Camera over the Rubik’s cube.  We use two LEGO Mindstorms motors to manipulate the cube: the first sits below the cradle to rotate the cube, and the second moves the shuffler arm to spin the cube on an opposite axis.
Rubik’s Build It, Solve It is similar to the conventional Rubik’s block, but with a twist. This block includes each the tools, bits and directions kids need to be able to construct a Rubik’s Cube of the own. After this block was assembled together, there’s an education booklet (it’s’s 10-pages in duration) which will direct you through the procedure for solving the Rubik’s Cube (eventually). Here, you’ll find everything from identifying the areas of the block to solving fundamental puzzles. With this toy, kids will be provided a slow and continuous introduction about the best way best to use the block and progress to harder struggles.
The Rubik's cube (sometimes misspelled rubix cube) is a mechanical 3D puzzle, invented more than 30 years ago and still considered as the best-selling toy of all times! Yet, solving the Rubik's Cube is considered a nearly-impossible task, which requires an IQ of 160... Is that really so hard? Definitely not!! Just follow this simple step by step solving guide and you'll shortly find out that you can solve the Rubik's cube as well… Let's get to work!
Rubik's cube is a toy puzzle designed by Erno Rubik during the mid-1970s. It is a cube-shaped device made up of smaller cube pieces with six faces having differing colors. The primary method of manufacture involves injection molding of the various component pieces, then subsequent assembly, labeling, and packaging. The cube was extremely popular during the 1980s, and at its peak between 1980 and 1983, 200 million cubes were sold world wide. Today sales continue to be over 500,000 cubes sold world wide each year.

Rubik’s cubes are 3-D combination puzzles. The 3x3x3 Rubik’s cubes have nine faces on each side of the square cube and each face has one of six solid colors. A traditional way to solve the Rubik’s cube is by returning the blocks so that each face of the cube has only one color.[1] However, since the cube’s creation in 1974, there have been many other ways found to “solve” the Rubik’s cube. Each of them create some sort of repetitive design over the faces of the cube.


If you're still reading, congratulations on not being put off by the time requirements! The first thing you are going to need to know about solving the cube is how the turns you make can be represented by letters. Later on in this guide, you're going to need a few algorithms. These are combinations of moves that rotate pieces or just move them around to get them where you want them. These algorithms are written using this notation, so you can always come back to this section if you've forgotten by the time we need them.
The Rubik's cube has baffled fans for over 40 years. Ever wanted to know how a Rubik's cube is made? with the Rubik's "build it solve it" kit you will unlock the secrets of the Rubik's cube and master it! now you can make your own and learn how to solve it at the same time! the Rubik's "build it solve it" kit comes with all the parts necessary to build your own Rubik's cube. Easy "how to" instructions, plastic cube pieces and tiles (including some spares), center core pieces, metal screws, Springs and screwdriver - all organized in a handy storage tray. Once you've built your cube, turn to the "you can do the Rubik's cube" booklet and learn how to solve it! by learning how to build your own Rubik's cube, you will greatly improve your understanding of how this fascinating puzzle functions, literally from the inside out.
The robot will turn the cube to each face and the camera will take 6 pictures, one of each side of the Cube.  The Raspberry Pi will determine the cube configuration from the six pictures. The Cube configuration will be passed to the kociemba Python library to find an efficient solution. Finally, the robot will execute the moves to solve the Rubik’s Cube!
If there are no more edges left on the top layer, then they are probably either inserted in the right place but flipped, or inserted in the wrong place. To get an edge out of somewhere it shouldn't be, just insert one of the yellow edges into that slot. This should get the edge out and on the top layer, ready for you to use the above instructions to insert correctly. Rubix Build
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