The Rubik's cube (sometimes misspelled rubix cube) is a mechanical 3D puzzle, invented more than 30 years ago and still considered as the best-selling toy of all times! Yet, solving the Rubik's Cube is considered a nearly-impossible task, which requires an IQ of 160... Is that really so hard? Definitely not!! Just follow this simple step by step solving guide and you'll shortly find out that you can solve the Rubik's cube as well… Let's get to work!

This Rubik’s Build It Solve It building kit is just for one player, and is one of the new toys for 2017. Winning Moves recommend that it will suit children of ages 8 and up. We have mentioned before, that this building kit is ideal for children and adults who like to figure things out. Anyone who likes to put puzzles together will love this. The Rubik’s Build It Solve It building kit will give you an inside look on how the cube works. You will also see how it is put together, and get some tips from the instruction manual on how you can solve it. Rubix Builders
Constructing the Cube is a superb way to exercise those fine motor skills, visual and spatial comprehension and cognitive thinking from children. When the block is placed together, it is going to challenge the small ones to use their spatial and visual understanding as they know to spin the tiles. The block also helps kids learn about colours and fitting them. Rubix Building Products
Dreamt up by cuber Daniel Stabile who posted a demonstration to YouTube and a how-to to Instructables, the paper cube is fully-functional if not particularly easy to use. On top of that, assembly will likely take you a while, but it will also teach about how the insides of these cubes—speedy and slow alike—actually function mechanically. In a video showing off the creations, Stabile demonstrates his first attempt, as well as a better-looking second version: Rubiks Build It Solve It
Here, we're looking at the colours that aren't solved. There are 21 different cases for the top layer, but we only need a couple of algorithms to solve them all. The first thing we want to find is headlights. Only 2 of the cases don't have any headlights (one of them is if you skip this step, and the cube is already solved). For the one case without headlights, just perform the algorithm below from any angle. This is a better case because when you do the next step, the cube will be solved already. Rubix Builders

Puzzle makers have been creating problems for people to solve for centuries. Some of the earliest puzzles date back to the time of the ancient Greeks and Romans. The Chinese have a ring puzzle that is thought to have been developed during the second century A.D. This was first described by Italian mathematician Girolamo Carolano (Cardan) in 1550. When the printing press was invented, complete books of mathematical and mechanical problems designed specifically for recreation were circulated. Rubix Build
×