Español: hacer patrones con el cubo de Rubik, Français: faire des formes originales avec votre Rubik’s Cube, Português: Fazer Padrões Incríveis Usando um Cubo Mágico, Deutsch: Mit einem Zauberwürfel beeindruckende Muster machen, Italiano: Creare Fantastiche Composizioni Sul Cubo Di Rubik, Русский: сделать замысловатый узор кубика Рубика, Bahasa Indonesia: Membuat Pola Kubus Rubik yang Keren, Nederlands: Gave patronen maken op een Rubiks kubus
Do you remember those complicated little Rubik’s block that we would sit there trying to figure out for what seems like hours? Did any of you guys/girls ever solve them? Maybe all it takes for us to solve the “cube” would be for us to see what it’s all about. While there are many mesmerizing toys that are about to emerge into our world, today, we would like to take a close look at the Rubik’s Build It, Solve It, because we believe this is the one-way ticket to finally solving the cube!
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Okay, we’re going to be honest with you – you know how aggravating the traditional Rubik’s Cube is, correct? If you’ve ever tried to solve one, you probably know exactly what we’re talking about here. Yes, this kit offers a behind-the-scenes look and even comes with a 10-page instruction manual, but this doesn’t necessarily mean you will be solving the puzzle like a professional within seconds.
Repeat the process. Turn back to your blue side and repeat the turns on opposite sides. Then, return once more to the red side and turn the opposite sides in opposite directions. And last, return once more to the blue side and turn the opposite sides in opposite directions. When you finish, you should have a staircase-like zig-zag across four sides of your Rubik’s cube.[4]
Puzzle makers have been creating problems for people to solve for centuries. Some of the earliest puzzles date back to the time of the ancient Greeks and Romans. The Chinese have a ring puzzle that is thought to have been developed during the second century A.D. This was first described by Italian mathematician Girolamo Carolano (Cardan) in 1550. When the printing press was invented, complete books of mathematical and mechanical problems designed specifically for recreation were circulated. Rubix Build
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