This Rubik’s Build It Solve It building kit is just for one player, and is one of the new toys for 2017. Winning Moves recommend that it will suit children of ages 8 and up. We have mentioned before, that this building kit is ideal for children and adults who like to figure things out. Anyone who likes to put puzzles together will love this. The Rubik’s Build It Solve It building kit will give you an inside look on how the cube works. You will also see how it is put together, and get some tips from the instruction manual on how you can solve it. Rubix Builders

Now you need to orient these pieces. Refer to the next picture. As you can see, the orange piece matches the orange centre. Look at the edges on your puzzle. You could have none matching, two matching or all matching. If you have all four edges matching the centres, your cross is solved. If you have none matching, perform a U move, then look around the cube again. You want to have at least two matching. If none of them match, do another U move. Repeat until you have either two or four edges matching their centres.
If there are no more edges left on the top layer, then they are probably either inserted in the right place but flipped, or inserted in the wrong place. To get an edge out of somewhere it shouldn't be, just insert one of the yellow edges into that slot. This should get the edge out and on the top layer, ready for you to use the above instructions to insert correctly.
Repeat the process. Turn back to your blue side and repeat the turns on opposite sides. Then, return once more to the red side and turn the opposite sides in opposite directions. And last, return once more to the blue side and turn the opposite sides in opposite directions. When you finish, you should have a staircase-like zig-zag across four sides of your Rubik’s cube.[4]
Rubik’s cubes are 3-D combination puzzles. The 3x3x3 Rubik’s cubes have nine faces on each side of the square cube and each face has one of six solid colors. A traditional way to solve the Rubik’s cube is by returning the blocks so that each face of the cube has only one color.[1] However, since the cube’s creation in 1974, there have been many other ways found to “solve” the Rubik’s cube. Each of them create some sort of repetitive design over the faces of the cube.

Rubik’s Build It Solve It is very similar to the traditional Rubik’s cube, but with a slight twist.  With this cube you get all of the tools and bit’s and pieces along with the instructions.  This is all you will need in order you you to build a Rubik’s Cube of your own. Once you have fitted the cube together, an instruction booklet has been included, and it is 10-pages in length. Finally, you will learn after all these years the process of solving Rubik’s Cube. You will be shown everything from identifying the parts of the cube along with solving basic puzzles. When you buy this toy, your children will be shown a slow and steady way of using the cube. They will then progress further with the toy to learn even harder challenges.


Simply put the 1x1x3 is a pseudo puzzle, It fills a gap in the collection but its not exactly complicated to solve. The way this puzzle was made was by using two centres and a core of a QiYi Sail. As these parts already spin like a 1x1x3 should all I had to do was make these parts into cubies by adding some apoxie sculpt and sanding them smooth. This puzzle was made in an afternoon and stickered the following morning while I was also building my 'Mefferts bandage cube'.

Here, we're looking at the colours that aren't solved. There are 21 different cases for the top layer, but we only need a couple of algorithms to solve them all. The first thing we want to find is headlights. Only 2 of the cases don't have any headlights (one of them is if you skip this step, and the cube is already solved). For the one case without headlights, just perform the algorithm below from any angle. This is a better case because when you do the next step, the cube will be solved already.
From these early riddles and word problems, toy puzzles were naturally developed. In 1857, the Irish mathematician Sir William Hamilton invented the Icosian puzzle. Sometime around 1870, the famous 15 Puzzle was introduced, reportedly by Sam Lloyd. This puzzle involved numerical tiles that had to be placed in order and became extremely popular in the early twentieth century. In 1883, French mathematician Edouard Lucas created the Tower of Hanoi puzzle. This puzzle was made up of three pegs and a number of discs with different sizes. The goal was to place the discs on the pegs in the correct order.

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Keeping white on top, turn the cube so that a different colour face is toward you. Follow the above instructions again. Repeat with the other two faces until the white cross is complete. This step is quite intuitive; you can do it for sure but it does take a little practice. Just move the white edges to their places not messing up the ones already fixed.  

Hi, your aluminum cube is beautiful. My 6 yr old son has asked me to help him make a cube. So I went to the Home Depot today and looked around the plumbing and hardware sections. I only found some PVC pipe attachments but nothing with 6 knobs. I also found some nuts and bolts but I don't know which kind to get. Could you give me some idea of what to buy? I don't have very many tools at home but I do have a drill if I needed to drill through the PVC pipe and copper pipe cutters if I needed to use metal piping. Please help.
Hi, your aluminum cube is beautiful. My 6 yr old son has asked me to help him make a cube. So I went to the Home Depot today and looked around the plumbing and hardware sections. I only found some PVC pipe attachments but nothing with 6 knobs. I also found some nuts and bolts but I don't know which kind to get. Could you give me some idea of what to buy? I don't have very many tools at home but I do have a drill if I needed to drill through the PVC pipe and copper pipe cutters if I needed to use metal piping. Please help.
The Rubik's cube (sometimes misspelled rubix cube) is a mechanical 3D puzzle, invented more than 30 years ago and still considered as the best-selling toy of all times! Yet, solving the Rubik's Cube is considered a nearly-impossible task, which requires an IQ of 160... Is that really so hard? Definitely not!! Just follow this simple step by step solving guide and you'll shortly find out that you can solve the Rubik's cube as well… Let's get to work! Rubix Build
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