Simply put the 1x1x3 is a pseudo puzzle, It fills a gap in the collection but its not exactly complicated to solve. The way this puzzle was made was by using two centres and a core of a QiYi Sail. As these parts already spin like a 1x1x3 should all I had to do was make these parts into cubies by adding some apoxie sculpt and sanding them smooth. This puzzle was made in an afternoon and stickered the following morning while I was also building my 'Mefferts bandage cube'.


An important thing to note is that this task is not a light one. It may require several hours of attempts. If you'd rather just solve the cube in your hand and forget about it rather than being able to solve any cube you're given, there are plenty of solvers available on the web. However, the satisfaction of holding a completed Rubik's Cube in your hand and thinking “I did that, and I can do it again” is greater than most, mainly due to the fact that the puzzle has been present in all our lives at some point. By the mid 1980's, an estimated fifth of the world's population had attempted to solve the cube. If you want to stand out and say that you can defeat the puzzle, time and determination is a large factor.
Introduced by Winning Moves, a leader in specialty toys & games, this game was released back in February 2017. This kit kit contains all the necessary pieces to build your own RUBIKS® CUBE. It’s not available in the UK at the time of writing, but it is available in the USA along with a range of similar kits. Having said that though, the Amazon USA link I’ve suggested below will supply to the UK. Additional costs are shown.
Erno Rubik, an architect and professor at the University of Budapest developed the first working prototype of the Rubik's cube in 1974. He received a Hungarian patent in 1975. Apparently, it was also independently designed by Terutoshi Ishige, an engineer from Japan, who received a Japanese patent in 1976. Professor Rubik created the cube as a teaching aid for his students to help them recognize three-dimensional spatial relationships. When he showed the working prototype to his students, it was an immediate hit.
Okay, we’re going to be honest with you – you know how aggravating the traditional Rubik’s Cube is, correct? If you’ve ever tried to solve one, you probably know exactly what we’re talking about here. Yes, this kit offers a behind-the-scenes look and even comes with a 10-page instruction manual, but this doesn’t necessarily mean you will be solving the puzzle like a professional within seconds.
Since the center pieces cannot be moved relatively to each other it's important to solve the edge pieces correctly in relation to each other. For example, when solving the white in our case- the green center piece is to the left of the red center piece, therefore the green-white edge piece should to be solved to the left of the red-white edge piece (see image).  

Headlights are fairly simple to spot. Looking at the image, we can see on the right hand side that the orange edge has a green corner on either side of it. That is a set of headlights. The left hand side has two different colours on either side, so that is not a set of headlights. It is very important to note that a full bar (a blue edge has a blue corner on either side of it, so all three pieces are blue) is also seen as a set of headlights. This is only seen in one case of the 21 though, so you won't see it often. If you have a set of headlights on each side, ignore this part and read the section titled “The U Permutation”. Rubix Builders
The project uses the Pi to directly solve the Rubik’s cube. The BrickPi3 takes the unsolved Rubik’s cube and the Raspberry Pi takes a picture of each side of the Rubik’s cube with the Raspberry Pi Camera. The Pi creates a text map of the color squares that shows where they are located on the cube. When it has fully mapped the cube, the Pi uses the “kociemba” python library to map out the moves needed to solve the Rubik’s cube. This information is taken by the Pi and BrickPi3 to solve the Rubik’s cube using the LEGO motors. The result: a solved Rubik’s cube. Rubiks Build It Solve It
Okay, we’re going to be honest with you – you know how aggravating the traditional Rubik’s Cube is, correct? If you’ve ever tried to solve one, you probably know exactly what we’re talking about here. Yes, this kit offers a behind-the-scenes look and even comes with a 10-page instruction manual, but this doesn’t necessarily mean you will be solving the puzzle like a professional within seconds. Rubix Building Solutions
Using the LEGO Camera support, attach the camera.  The small black lens of the camera should fit between the two LEGO beam supports.  Secure the camera in place to the LEGO supports with some electrical tape.  This is a good time to make sure that the camera is position to be able to capture the entire Rubik’s cube.  You can take a test picture with the raspistill command
There are many approaches on how to solve the Rubik's Cube. All these methods have different levels of difficulties, for speedcubers or beginners, even for solving the cube blindfolded. People usually get stuck solving the cube after completing the first face, after that they need some help. In the following article I'm going to show you the easiest way to solve the cube using the beginner's method.
If you were around in the 1980’s and did not live under a rock, you had a Rubik’s cube.  It was the 3D combination puzzle that had children and adults mesmerized trying to solve the impossible puzzle.  We would spend hours twisting and turning the cube to figure the solution. The cube was invented by an Hungarian professor of architecture, Erno Rubik, in 1974.  Although it took Erno over one month to solve his very own puzzle, it  became a fad and everyone had one. Consequently, it became the world’s best selling toy ever at that time.
Using the LEGO Camera support, attach the camera.  The small black lens of the camera should fit between the two LEGO beam supports.  Secure the camera in place to the LEGO supports with some electrical tape.  This is a good time to make sure that the camera is position to be able to capture the entire Rubik’s cube.  You can take a test picture with the raspistill command Rubiks Build It Solve It Review
Repeat the process. Turn back to your blue side and repeat the turns on opposite sides. Then, return once more to the red side and turn the opposite sides in opposite directions. And last, return once more to the blue side and turn the opposite sides in opposite directions. When you finish, you should have a staircase-like zig-zag across four sides of your Rubik’s cube.[4]

Simply put the 1x1x3 is a pseudo puzzle, It fills a gap in the collection but its not exactly complicated to solve. The way this puzzle was made was by using two centres and a core of a QiYi Sail. As these parts already spin like a 1x1x3 should all I had to do was make these parts into cubies by adding some apoxie sculpt and sanding them smooth. This puzzle was made in an afternoon and stickered the following morning while I was also building my 'Mefferts bandage cube'.
3 The Rubik's cube parts are taken to an assembly line. In this phase of production, the individual cube pieces are put together. Starting with the nylon core, each ABS center cube is riveted to the core with a spring spacer. The rivet is carefully controlled with a depth stop to ensure the spring is compressed just the right amount. Each center cube has a plastic cover that is glued on to hide the rivet. One of the six center cubes is left until the last part of the assembly. The ABS edges and corner pieces are individually stacked around the core. The cube is built from the bottom up and the last piece to be assembled is the final center cube which is again riveted into the core with a spring spacer and the final cap is glued on.

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Puzzle makers have been creating problems for people to solve for centuries. Some of the earliest puzzles date back to the time of the ancient Greeks and Romans. The Chinese have a ring puzzle that is thought to have been developed during the second century A.D. This was first described by Italian mathematician Girolamo Carolano (Cardan) in 1550. When the printing press was invented, complete books of mathematical and mechanical problems designed specifically for recreation were circulated. Rubix Build
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