From these early riddles and word problems, toy puzzles were naturally developed. In 1857, the Irish mathematician Sir William Hamilton invented the Icosian puzzle. Sometime around 1870, the famous 15 Puzzle was introduced, reportedly by Sam Lloyd. This puzzle involved numerical tiles that had to be placed in order and became extremely popular in the early twentieth century. In 1883, French mathematician Edouard Lucas created the Tower of Hanoi puzzle. This puzzle was made up of three pegs and a number of discs with different sizes. The goal was to place the discs on the pegs in the correct order.
Keeping white on top, turn the cube so that a different colour face is toward you. Follow the above instructions again. Repeat with the other two faces until the white cross is complete. This step is quite intuitive; you can do it for sure but it does take a little practice. Just move the white edges to their places not messing up the ones already fixed.  
Dreamt up by cuber Daniel Stabile who posted a demonstration to YouTube and a how-to to Instructables, the paper cube is fully-functional if not particularly easy to use. On top of that, assembly will likely take you a while, but it will also teach about how the insides of these cubes—speedy and slow alike—actually function mechanically. In a video showing off the creations, Stabile demonstrates his first attempt, as well as a better-looking second version:

The robot will turn the cube to each face and the camera will take 6 pictures, one of each side of the Cube.  The Raspberry Pi will determine the cube configuration from the six pictures. The Cube configuration will be passed to the kociemba Python library to find an efficient solution. Finally, the robot will execute the moves to solve the Rubik’s Cube!
If you're still reading, congratulations on not being put off by the time requirements! The first thing you are going to need to know about solving the cube is how the turns you make can be represented by letters. Later on in this guide, you're going to need a few algorithms. These are combinations of moves that rotate pieces or just move them around to get them where you want them. These algorithms are written using this notation, so you can always come back to this section if you've forgotten by the time we need them. Rubiks Build It Solve It Instructions

The project uses the Pi to directly solve the Rubik’s cube. The BrickPi3 takes the unsolved Rubik’s cube and the Raspberry Pi takes a picture of each side of the Rubik’s cube with the Raspberry Pi Camera. The Pi creates a text map of the color squares that shows where they are located on the cube. When it has fully mapped the cube, the Pi uses the “kociemba” python library to map out the moves needed to solve the Rubik’s cube. This information is taken by the Pi and BrickPi3 to solve the Rubik’s cube using the LEGO motors. The result: a solved Rubik’s cube.
This Rubik’s Build It, Solve It kit is for one player – it is recommended for ages 8 and up. As we said before, it is great for children and adults that don’t mind trying to figure out how the cube works – it’s great for those that enjoy putting puzzles together. This kit right here is going to give an inside look on how the cube works and how it’s put together. Plus, you’ll receive some tips in the instruction manual on how to solve it. Rubix Build
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