When you eventually get the desired position, there are two slightly different variations of it. For this, we need to look at the front of the cube. The yellow corner facing the front can be  in two positions: Either facing the front, or facing the right. In the first image, it is facing the front. This shows you have Sune. To solve it, just do the above algorithm one more time, and you should have oriented all of the top layer.


This Rubik’s Build It, Solve It kit is for one player – it is recommended for ages 8 and up. As we said before, it is great for children and adults that don’t mind trying to figure out how the cube works – it’s great for those that enjoy putting puzzles together. This kit right here is going to give an inside look on how the cube works and how it’s put together. Plus, you’ll receive some tips in the instruction manual on how to solve it.

If you have 2 adjacent well permuted corners- turn the upper face once clockwise (U). That move will reposition the corners into a situation which only one well permuted corner will remain while the other three corners needed to be rotated counter-clockwise. Now just execute the algorithm above, and by this single execution you actually completed this step (remember to execute this algorithm from the correct angle – when the well permuted corner is on the back right. see algorithm image above). Rubiks Build It Solve It Instructions
If there are no more edges left on the top layer, then they are probably either inserted in the right place but flipped, or inserted in the wrong place. To get an edge out of somewhere it shouldn't be, just insert one of the yellow edges into that slot. This should get the edge out and on the top layer, ready for you to use the above instructions to insert correctly.
The Rubik's cube appears to be made up of 26 smaller cubes. In its solved state, it has six faces, each made up of nine small square faces of the same color. While it appears that all of the small faces can be moved, only the corners and edges can actually move. The center cubes are each fixed and only rotate in place. When the cube is taken apart it can be seen that the center cubes are each connected by axles to an inner core. The corners and edges are not fixed to anything. This allows them to move around the center cubes. The cube maintains its shape because the corners and edges hold each other in place and are retained by the center cubes. Each piece has an internal tab that is retained by the center cubes and trapped by the surrounding pieces. These tabs are shaped to fit along a curved track that is created by the backs of the other pieces. The central cubes are fixed with a spring and rivet and retain all the surrounding pieces. The spring exerts just the right pressure to hold all the pieces in place while giving enough flexibility for a smooth and forgiving function.
Hi, your aluminum cube is beautiful. My 6 yr old son has asked me to help him make a cube. So I went to the Home Depot today and looked around the plumbing and hardware sections. I only found some PVC pipe attachments but nothing with 6 knobs. I also found some nuts and bolts but I don't know which kind to get. Could you give me some idea of what to buy? I don't have very many tools at home but I do have a drill if I needed to drill through the PVC pipe and copper pipe cutters if I needed to use metal piping. Please help.

Rubik’s Build It, Solve It is similar to the conventional Rubik’s block, but with a twist. This block includes each the tools, bits and directions kids need to be able to construct a Rubik’s Cube of the own. After this block was assembled together, there’s an education booklet (it’s’s 10-pages in duration) which will direct you through the procedure for solving the Rubik’s Cube (eventually). Here, you’ll find everything from identifying the areas of the block to solving fundamental puzzles. With this toy, kids will be provided a slow and continuous introduction about the best way best to use the block and progress to harder struggles. Rubix Build
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