The individual pieces that make up the Rubik's cube are typically produced from plastic. Plastics are high molecular weight materials that can be produced through various chemical reactions called polymerization. Most of the plastics used in a Rubik's cube are thermoplastics. These compounds are rigid, durable, and can be permanently molded into various shapes. The plastics used in the Rubik's cube are acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and nylon. Other plastics that might be used include polypropylene (PP), high impact polystyrene (HIPS), and high density polyethylene (HDPE).
This Rubik’s Build It Solve It building kit is just for one player, and is one of the new toys for 2017. Winning Moves recommend that it will suit children of ages 8 and up. We have mentioned before, that this building kit is ideal for children and adults who like to figure things out. Anyone who likes to put puzzles together will love this. The Rubik’s Build It Solve It building kit will give you an inside look on how the cube works. You will also see how it is put together, and get some tips from the instruction manual on how you can solve it.
If you were around in the 1980’s and did not live under a rock, you had a Rubik’s cube.  It was the 3D combination puzzle that had children and adults mesmerized trying to solve the impossible puzzle.  We would spend hours twisting and turning the cube to figure the solution. The cube was invented by an Hungarian professor of architecture, Erno Rubik, in 1974.  Although it took Erno over one month to solve his very own puzzle, it  became a fad and everyone had one. Consequently, it became the world’s best selling toy ever at that time.

Keeping white on top, turn the cube so that a different colour face is toward you. Follow the above instructions again. Repeat with the other two faces until the white cross is complete. This step is quite intuitive; you can do it for sure but it does take a little practice. Just move the white edges to their places not messing up the ones already fixed.  


Here, we're looking at the colours that aren't solved. There are 21 different cases for the top layer, but we only need a couple of algorithms to solve them all. The first thing we want to find is headlights. Only 2 of the cases don't have any headlights (one of them is if you skip this step, and the cube is already solved). For the one case without headlights, just perform the algorithm below from any angle. This is a better case because when you do the next step, the cube will be solved already.
Headlights are fairly simple to spot. Looking at the image, we can see on the right hand side that the orange edge has a green corner on either side of it. That is a set of headlights. The left hand side has two different colours on either side, so that is not a set of headlights. It is very important to note that a full bar (a blue edge has a blue corner on either side of it, so all three pieces are blue) is also seen as a set of headlights. This is only seen in one case of the 21 though, so you won't see it often. If you have a set of headlights on each side, ignore this part and read the section titled “The U Permutation”.
Over the next few years, Rubik worked with a manufacturer to allow production of the cube on a mass scale. After three years of development, the first cubes were available on toy store shelves in Budapest. While the cube remained popular in Hungry, the political atmosphere of the time made it difficult for it to be introduced in the United States. The two men who were most responsible for making the cube an international success were Dr. Laczi Tibor and Tom Kremer of Seven Towns Ltd., London. Seven Towns licensed the Rubik Cube invention from Professor Rubik for worldwide distribution. Dr. Tibor worked within Hungry to convince bureaucrats to allow the technology out of the country. Kremer found a United States toy maker, the Ideal Toy company, who was willing to help market the product. The product was an immediate hit, and during the 1980s, over 200 million cubes were sold. Around 1983, the frenzied popularity of the cube began to wane and sales slowed drastically. It remained in small scale production until Seven Towns took over the marketing, and licensed the Rubik Cube to the Oddzon Company for the United States market in 1995. Since that time sales have steadily increased to over 500,000 units a year.

The standard Rubik's cube has sides of about 2.2 in (5.7 cm) per square. Various other sizes have also been produced such as a 1.5 in (3.8 cm) mini cube, a 0.8 in (2 cm) key chain micro cube, and a 3.5 in (9 cm) giant cube. While the standard cube is a 3 × 3 × 3 segmentation other types have also been introduced. Some of the more interesting ones include the 2 × 2 × 2 cube, the 4 × 4 × 4 cube (called Rubik's Revenge) and the 5 × 5 × 5 cube. The shape has also been varied and puzzles in the form of a tetrahedral, a pyramid, and an octahedral are among types that were produced. The Rubik's cube also led to the development of game derivatives like the Rubik's cube puzzle and the Rub it cube eraser.


This Rubik’s Build It Solve It building kit is just for one player, and is one of the new toys for 2017. Winning Moves recommend that it will suit children of ages 8 and up. We have mentioned before, that this building kit is ideal for children and adults who like to figure things out. Anyone who likes to put puzzles together will love this. The Rubik’s Build It Solve It building kit will give you an inside look on how the cube works. You will also see how it is put together, and get some tips from the instruction manual on how you can solve it. Rubix Builders
5 After all the labeling is completed, the cubes are put in their final packaging. This can be a small box that has an instruction booklet included or a plastic blister pack with a cardboard backing. The package serves the dual purpose of protecting the Rubik's cube from damage caused by shipping and advertising the product. The Rubik's cube packages are put into cases and moved to a pallet. The pallets are then loaded on trucks and the products are shipped all over the world. Rubiks Build It Solve It Review

The standard Rubik's cube has sides of about 2.2 in (5.7 cm) per square. Various other sizes have also been produced such as a 1.5 in (3.8 cm) mini cube, a 0.8 in (2 cm) key chain micro cube, and a 3.5 in (9 cm) giant cube. While the standard cube is a 3 × 3 × 3 segmentation other types have also been introduced. Some of the more interesting ones include the 2 × 2 × 2 cube, the 4 × 4 × 4 cube (called Rubik's Revenge) and the 5 × 5 × 5 cube. The shape has also been varied and puzzles in the form of a tetrahedral, a pyramid, and an octahedral are among types that were produced. The Rubik's cube also led to the development of game derivatives like the Rubik's cube puzzle and the Rub it cube eraser. Rubix Building Solutions
If you have 2 adjacent well permuted corners- turn the upper face once clockwise (U). That move will reposition the corners into a situation which only one well permuted corner will remain while the other three corners needed to be rotated counter-clockwise. Now just execute the algorithm above, and by this single execution you actually completed this step (remember to execute this algorithm from the correct angle – when the well permuted corner is on the back right. see algorithm image above). Rubiks Build It Solve It Instructions

Rubik’s Build It Solve It is very similar to the traditional Rubik’s cube, but with a slight twist.  With this cube you get all of the tools and bit’s and pieces along with the instructions.  This is all you will need in order you you to build a Rubik’s Cube of your own. Once you have fitted the cube together, an instruction booklet has been included, and it is 10-pages in length. Finally, you will learn after all these years the process of solving Rubik’s Cube. You will be shown everything from identifying the parts of the cube along with solving basic puzzles. When you buy this toy, your children will be shown a slow and steady way of using the cube. They will then progress further with the toy to learn even harder challenges.


The manufacture of the first Rubik's cube prototypes was by hand. During the late 1970s, methods for mass production were developed and continue to be used today. Typically, production is a step by step process that involves injection molding of the pieces, fitting the pieces together, decorating the Rubik's cube, and putting the finished product in packaging.
Headlights are fairly simple to spot. Looking at the image, we can see on the right hand side that the orange edge has a green corner on either side of it. That is a set of headlights. The left hand side has two different colours on either side, so that is not a set of headlights. It is very important to note that a full bar (a blue edge has a blue corner on either side of it, so all three pieces are blue) is also seen as a set of headlights. This is only seen in one case of the 21 though, so you won't see it often. If you have a set of headlights on each side, ignore this part and read the section titled “The U Permutation”.
Begin with your cube solved. Once again, you want to start off with your Rubik’s cube in its solved position. Making a fish pattern on your Rubik’s cube is simple. The end result will have swapped two edge pieces so that the remaining ones look like a fish with fins. If you hold the cube diagonally it will look like a fish swimming away from you.[7] Rubiks Build It Solve It
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