If you're still reading, congratulations on not being put off by the time requirements! The first thing you are going to need to know about solving the cube is how the turns you make can be represented by letters. Later on in this guide, you're going to need a few algorithms. These are combinations of moves that rotate pieces or just move them around to get them where you want them. These algorithms are written using this notation, so you can always come back to this section if you've forgotten by the time we need them. Rubiks Build It Solve It Instructions
If you were around in the 1980’s and did not live under a rock, you had a Rubik’s cube.  It was the 3D combination puzzle that had children and adults mesmerized trying to solve the impossible puzzle.  We would spend hours twisting and turning the cube to figure the solution. The cube was invented by an Hungarian professor of architecture, Erno Rubik, in 1974.  Although it took Erno over one month to solve his very own puzzle, it  became a fad and everyone had one. Consequently, it became the world’s best selling toy ever at that time.
Since the center pieces cannot be moved relatively to each other it's important to solve the edge pieces correctly in relation to each other. For example, when solving the white in our case- the green center piece is to the left of the red center piece, therefore the green-white edge piece should to be solved to the left of the red-white edge piece (see image).

Rubik’s cubes are 3-D combination puzzles. The 3x3x3 Rubik’s cubes have nine faces on each side of the square cube and each face has one of six solid colors. A traditional way to solve the Rubik’s cube is by returning the blocks so that each face of the cube has only one color.[1] However, since the cube’s creation in 1974, there have been many other ways found to “solve” the Rubik’s cube. Each of them create some sort of repetitive design over the faces of the cube.
Alright, let us be clear here. Do you remember how aggravated you used to get when trying to do the traditional Rubik’s Cube. Did you ever try to solve it, remember how frustrating it could be. Well, let me tell you that the Rubik’s Build It Solve building kit offers you a behind-the-scenes look. Winning Moves even give you a 10-page instruction manual. But this does not mean you could be solving the puzzle within seconds like a professional.

From these early riddles and word problems, toy puzzles were naturally developed. In 1857, the Irish mathematician Sir William Hamilton invented the Icosian puzzle. Sometime around 1870, the famous 15 Puzzle was introduced, reportedly by Sam Lloyd. This puzzle involved numerical tiles that had to be placed in order and became extremely popular in the early twentieth century. In 1883, French mathematician Edouard Lucas created the Tower of Hanoi puzzle. This puzzle was made up of three pegs and a number of discs with different sizes. The goal was to place the discs on the pegs in the correct order.
3 The Rubik's cube parts are taken to an assembly line. In this phase of production, the individual cube pieces are put together. Starting with the nylon core, each ABS center cube is riveted to the core with a spring spacer. The rivet is carefully controlled with a depth stop to ensure the spring is compressed just the right amount. Each center cube has a plastic cover that is glued on to hide the rivet. One of the six center cubes is left until the last part of the assembly. The ABS edges and corner pieces are individually stacked around the core. The cube is built from the bottom up and the last piece to be assembled is the final center cube which is again riveted into the core with a spring spacer and the final cap is glued on.
Do you remember those complicated little Rubik’s block that we would sit there trying to figure out for what seems like hours? Did any of you guys/girls ever solve them? Maybe all it takes for us to solve the “cube” would be for us to see what it’s all about. While there are many mesmerizing toys that are about to emerge into our world, today, we would like to take a close look in this Rubik’s Build It Solve It Review, because we believe this is the one-way ticket to finally solving the cube! Rubix Build
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