The quality of the individual parts are also inspected just after exiting the mold. Since thousands of parts are made daily, a complete inspection would be difficult. Consequently, line inspectors may randomly check the plastic parts at fixed time intervals and check to ensure they meet size, shape, and consistency specifications. This sampling method provides a good indication of the quality of the overall Rubik's cube production run. Things that are looked for include deformed parts, improperly fitted parts and inappropriate labeling. While visual inspection is the primary test method employed, more rigorous measurements may also be performed. Measuring equipment is used to check the length, width, and thickness of each part. Typically, devices such as a vernier caliper, a micrometer, or a microscope are used. Just prior to putting a cube in the packaging it may be twisted to ensure that it holds together and is in proper working order. This can be done by hand or by a turning machine. If a toy is found to be defective it is placed aside to be reworked later.

The Rubik’s cube has recently begun making a comeback. Invented in 1974, it is the world’s best-selling toy. But solving them takes thought, effort, and skill . . . so why not let a robot do it? In this project, we take a Raspberry Pi, a BrickPi, and a set of LEGO Mindstorms and build a Rubik’s cube solving robot. Simply place an unsolved Rubik’s cube in the solver, run the python program, and your Rubik’s cube is solved! 

Build A Rubix Cube


When you get round to building the Rubik’s Cube, you will find it is not as hard as it appears.  The instructions are quite easy to follow and it will probably take you about fifteen minutes. When you get round to placing the colored tiles, pay attention to where they are supposed to go. Because once you snap them into place. you will not be able to remove them. Having said that. you can still use the Rubik’s Cube. What you will not be able to do is follow the instruction guide and solve the puzzle.
Okay, we’re going to be honest with you – you know how aggravating the traditional Rubik’s Cube is, correct? If you’ve ever tried to solve one, you probably know exactly what we’re talking about here. Yes, this kit offers a behind-the-scenes look and even comes with a 10-page instruction manual, but this doesn’t necessarily mean you will be solving the puzzle like a professional within seconds. Rubix Building Solutions
Rubik’s Build It, Solve It. Can you recall those complex small Rubik’s cube which we’d sit there trying to work out for what seems like hours? Did any one of you guys/girls ever resolve them? Perhaps all it requires us to fix the “block” is for us to find out exactly what it’s about. When there are lots of mesmerizing toys which are just about to emerge into our planet, now, we’d love to have a good look at the Rubik’s Build It, Solve It, since we think this is the one time ticket to eventually solving the block!
Whether you complete all 6 stages or 1, be sure to tell your teacher about this program so all your classmates can solve with you! Teachers from all over the country use our program, at no cost, to teach their classes not only to solve, but math, art, science, and more. Hundreds of schools compete at solving cubes as a group and classes create really cool mosaic designs too. We even have ongoing mosaic contests each year. So check out our site and learn how you can do even more with a Rubik's® Cube!
Over the next few years, Rubik worked with a manufacturer to allow production of the cube on a mass scale. After three years of development, the first cubes were available on toy store shelves in Budapest. While the cube remained popular in Hungry, the political atmosphere of the time made it difficult for it to be introduced in the United States. The two men who were most responsible for making the cube an international success were Dr. Laczi Tibor and Tom Kremer of Seven Towns Ltd., London. Seven Towns licensed the Rubik Cube invention from Professor Rubik for worldwide distribution. Dr. Tibor worked within Hungry to convince bureaucrats to allow the technology out of the country. Kremer found a United States toy maker, the Ideal Toy company, who was willing to help market the product. The product was an immediate hit, and during the 1980s, over 200 million cubes were sold. Around 1983, the frenzied popularity of the cube began to wane and sales slowed drastically. It remained in small scale production until Seven Towns took over the marketing, and licensed the Rubik Cube to the Oddzon Company for the United States market in 1995. Since that time sales have steadily increased to over 500,000 units a year.

For decorative purposes, a colorant is typically added to the plastic. The pieces of a Rubik's cube are typically black. During production, colored stickers are put on the outside of the cube to denote the color of a side. The plastics that are used during production are supplied to the manufacturer in a pellet form complete with the filler and colorants. These pellets can then be loaded into the molding machines directly.
Here, we're looking at the colours that aren't solved. There are 21 different cases for the top layer, but we only need a couple of algorithms to solve them all. The first thing we want to find is headlights. Only 2 of the cases don't have any headlights (one of them is if you skip this step, and the cube is already solved). For the one case without headlights, just perform the algorithm below from any angle. This is a better case because when you do the next step, the cube will be solved already. Rubix Builders
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