The Rubik's cube (sometimes misspelled rubix cube) is a mechanical 3D puzzle, invented more than 30 years ago and still considered as the best-selling toy of all times! Yet, solving the Rubik's Cube is considered a nearly-impossible task, which requires an IQ of 160... Is that really so hard? Definitely not!! Just follow this simple step by step solving guide and you'll shortly find out that you can solve the Rubik's cube as well… Let's get to work!
Simply put the 1x1x3 is a pseudo puzzle, It fills a gap in the collection but its not exactly complicated to solve. The way this puzzle was made was by using two centres and a core of a QiYi Sail. As these parts already spin like a 1x1x3 should all I had to do was make these parts into cubies by adding some apoxie sculpt and sanding them smooth. This puzzle was made in an afternoon and stickered the following morning while I was also building my 'Mefferts bandage cube'.

Rubiks Build It Solve It


Important! The center pieces are part of the core and subsequently cannot move relatively to each other. For that reason they are already "solved". The solving process is actually bringing all corner and edge pieces to the "already solved" center pieces (meaning there are only 20 pieces to solve out of the 26). For example, the blue center piece will always be opposite to the green center piece (on a standard color-scheme cube). It doesn't matter how hard you will try scrambling the cube, it will just stay that way.
The Rubik's cube (sometimes misspelled rubix cube) is a mechanical 3D puzzle, invented more than 30 years ago and still considered as the best-selling toy of all times! Yet, solving the Rubik's Cube is considered a nearly-impossible task, which requires an IQ of 160... Is that really so hard? Definitely not!! Just follow this simple step by step solving guide and you'll shortly find out that you can solve the Rubik's cube as well… Let's get to work! Rubix Build
Erno Rubik, an architect and professor at the University of Budapest developed the first working prototype of the Rubik's cube in 1974. He received a Hungarian patent in 1975. Apparently, it was also independently designed by Terutoshi Ishige, an engineer from Japan, who received a Japanese patent in 1976. Professor Rubik created the cube as a teaching aid for his students to help them recognize three-dimensional spatial relationships. When he showed the working prototype to his students, it was an immediate hit.
The Rubik’s Build It, Solve It kit is for one player.  Although ages 8 and up are recommended, I believe younger children will enjoy playing with the assembled toy.  As we said before, it is great for children and adults that don’t mind trying to figure out how the cube works – it’s great for those that enjoy putting puzzles together. The kit gives an inside look on how the cube works and how it is put together. Plus, you will receive some tips in the instruction manual on how to solve it.
There are various puzzles that involve colored square tiles and colored cubes. Some early precursors to the Rubik's cube include devices such as the Katzenjammer and the Mayblox puzzle. The Mayblox puzzle was created by British mathematician Percy MacMahon in the early 1920s. In the 1960s, Parker Bothers introduced another cube puzzle type toy called Instant Insanity. This toy achieved a moderate level of popularity in the United States. The early 1970s brought with it a device called the Pyraminx, which was invented by Uwe Meffert. This toy was a pyramid that had movable pieces that were to be lined up according to color.
Here, we're looking at the colours that aren't solved. There are 21 different cases for the top layer, but we only need a couple of algorithms to solve them all. The first thing we want to find is headlights. Only 2 of the cases don't have any headlights (one of them is if you skip this step, and the cube is already solved). For the one case without headlights, just perform the algorithm below from any angle. This is a better case because when you do the next step, the cube will be solved already. Rubix Builders
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