The standard Rubik's cube has sides of about 2.2 in (5.7 cm) per square. Various other sizes have also been produced such as a 1.5 in (3.8 cm) mini cube, a 0.8 in (2 cm) key chain micro cube, and a 3.5 in (9 cm) giant cube. While the standard cube is a 3 × 3 × 3 segmentation other types have also been introduced. Some of the more interesting ones include the 2 × 2 × 2 cube, the 4 × 4 × 4 cube (called Rubik's Revenge) and the 5 × 5 × 5 cube. The shape has also been varied and puzzles in the form of a tetrahedral, a pyramid, and an octahedral are among types that were produced. The Rubik's cube also led to the development of game derivatives like the Rubik's cube puzzle and the Rub it cube eraser. Rubix Building Solutions
Rubik's cube is a toy puzzle designed by Erno Rubik during the mid-1970s. It is a cube-shaped device made up of smaller cube pieces with six faces having differing colors. The primary method of manufacture involves injection molding of the various component pieces, then subsequent assembly, labeling, and packaging. The cube was extremely popular during the 1980s, and at its peak between 1980 and 1983, 200 million cubes were sold world wide. Today sales continue to be over 500,000 cubes sold world wide each year.
Over the next few years, Rubik worked with a manufacturer to allow production of the cube on a mass scale. After three years of development, the first cubes were available on toy store shelves in Budapest. While the cube remained popular in Hungry, the political atmosphere of the time made it difficult for it to be introduced in the United States. The two men who were most responsible for making the cube an international success were Dr. Laczi Tibor and Tom Kremer of Seven Towns Ltd., London. Seven Towns licensed the Rubik Cube invention from Professor Rubik for worldwide distribution. Dr. Tibor worked within Hungry to convince bureaucrats to allow the technology out of the country. Kremer found a United States toy maker, the Ideal Toy company, who was willing to help market the product. The product was an immediate hit, and during the 1980s, over 200 million cubes were sold. Around 1983, the frenzied popularity of the cube began to wane and sales slowed drastically. It remained in small scale production until Seven Towns took over the marketing, and licensed the Rubik Cube to the Oddzon Company for the United States market in 1995. Since that time sales have steadily increased to over 500,000 units a year.

In this step we have four pieces to solve. First choose a color to begin with. I chose white in this guide. For this time, choose the white as well, so the images along the solution will be relevant to your solving process. In addition, it is best to start with the white/yellow colors as they are the easiest colors for quick recognition which is important for speedsolving.
4 Next, the Rubik's cube faces need to be labeled. The labels are made from sheet polypropylene material that is printed with the colors. The printed sheet PP is then laminated with a clear PP protective covering. The material is then die cut with the labels wound onto rolls. The labels are made with all nine squares of each face exactly aligned. This way the labels can be perfectly aligned when they are applied to the cube.
Rubik’s Build It, Solve It is similar to the conventional Rubik’s block, but with a twist. This block includes each the tools, bits and directions kids need to be able to construct a Rubik’s Cube of the own. After this block was assembled together, there’s an education booklet (it’s’s 10-pages in duration) which will direct you through the procedure for solving the Rubik’s Cube (eventually). Here, you’ll find everything from identifying the areas of the block to solving fundamental puzzles. With this toy, kids will be provided a slow and continuous introduction about the best way best to use the block and progress to harder struggles. Rubix Build
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