Rubik’s Build It Solve It is very similar to the traditional Rubik’s cube, but with a slight twist.  With this cube you get all of the tools and bit’s and pieces along with the instructions.  This is all you will need in order you you to build a Rubik’s Cube of your own. Once you have fitted the cube together, an instruction booklet has been included, and it is 10-pages in length. Finally, you will learn after all these years the process of solving Rubik’s Cube. You will be shown everything from identifying the parts of the cube along with solving basic puzzles. When you buy this toy, your children will be shown a slow and steady way of using the cube. They will then progress further with the toy to learn even harder challenges.
If you're still reading, congratulations on not being put off by the time requirements! The first thing you are going to need to know about solving the cube is how the turns you make can be represented by letters. Later on in this guide, you're going to need a few algorithms. These are combinations of moves that rotate pieces or just move them around to get them where you want them. These algorithms are written using this notation, so you can always come back to this section if you've forgotten by the time we need them.
The robot will turn the cube to each face and the camera will take 6 pictures, one of each side of the Cube.  The Raspberry Pi will determine the cube configuration from the six pictures. The Cube configuration will be passed to the kociemba Python library to find an efficient solution. Finally, the robot will execute the moves to solve the Rubik’s Cube!

Begin with your cube solved. Once again, you want to start off with your Rubik’s cube in its solved position. Making a fish pattern on your Rubik’s cube is simple. The end result will have swapped two edge pieces so that the remaining ones look like a fish with fins. If you hold the cube diagonally it will look like a fish swimming away from you.[7]
Rubik’s Build It, Solve It. Can you recall those complex small Rubik’s cube which we’d sit there trying to work out for what seems like hours? Did any one of you guys/girls ever resolve them? Perhaps all it requires us to fix the “block” is for us to find out exactly what it’s about. When there are lots of mesmerizing toys which are just about to emerge into our planet, now, we’d love to have a good look at the Rubik’s Build It, Solve It, since we think this is the one time ticket to eventually solving the block!
Since the center pieces cannot be moved relatively to each other it's important to solve the edge pieces correctly in relation to each other. For example, when solving the white in our case- the green center piece is to the left of the red center piece, therefore the green-white edge piece should to be solved to the left of the red-white edge piece (see image).
In this step we have four pieces to solve. First choose a color to begin with. I chose white in this guide. For this time, choose the white as well, so the images along the solution will be relevant to your solving process. In addition, it is best to start with the white/yellow colors as they are the easiest colors for quick recognition which is important for speedsolving.

From these early riddles and word problems, toy puzzles were naturally developed. In 1857, the Irish mathematician Sir William Hamilton invented the Icosian puzzle. Sometime around 1870, the famous 15 Puzzle was introduced, reportedly by Sam Lloyd. This puzzle involved numerical tiles that had to be placed in order and became extremely popular in the early twentieth century. In 1883, French mathematician Edouard Lucas created the Tower of Hanoi puzzle. This puzzle was made up of three pegs and a number of discs with different sizes. The goal was to place the discs on the pegs in the correct order.
Headlights are fairly simple to spot. Looking at the image, we can see on the right hand side that the orange edge has a green corner on either side of it. That is a set of headlights. The left hand side has two different colours on either side, so that is not a set of headlights. It is very important to note that a full bar (a blue edge has a blue corner on either side of it, so all three pieces are blue) is also seen as a set of headlights. This is only seen in one case of the 21 though, so you won't see it often. If you have a set of headlights on each side, ignore this part and read the section titled “The U Permutation”.

Using the LEGO Camera support, attach the camera.  The small black lens of the camera should fit between the two LEGO beam supports.  Secure the camera in place to the LEGO supports with some electrical tape.  This is a good time to make sure that the camera is position to be able to capture the entire Rubik’s cube.  You can take a test picture with the raspistill command


Here, we're looking at the colours that aren't solved. There are 21 different cases for the top layer, but we only need a couple of algorithms to solve them all. The first thing we want to find is headlights. Only 2 of the cases don't have any headlights (one of them is if you skip this step, and the cube is already solved). For the one case without headlights, just perform the algorithm below from any angle. This is a better case because when you do the next step, the cube will be solved already. Rubix Builders
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