The standard Rubik's cube has sides of about 2.2 in (5.7 cm) per square. Various other sizes have also been produced such as a 1.5 in (3.8 cm) mini cube, a 0.8 in (2 cm) key chain micro cube, and a 3.5 in (9 cm) giant cube. While the standard cube is a 3 × 3 × 3 segmentation other types have also been introduced. Some of the more interesting ones include the 2 × 2 × 2 cube, the 4 × 4 × 4 cube (called Rubik's Revenge) and the 5 × 5 × 5 cube. The shape has also been varied and puzzles in the form of a tetrahedral, a pyramid, and an octahedral are among types that were produced. The Rubik's cube also led to the development of game derivatives like the Rubik's cube puzzle and the Rub it cube eraser.


Begin with your cube solved. Once again, you want to start off with your Rubik’s cube in its solved position. Making a fish pattern on your Rubik’s cube is simple. The end result will have swapped two edge pieces so that the remaining ones look like a fish with fins. If you hold the cube diagonally it will look like a fish swimming away from you.[7]
For decorative purposes, a colorant is typically added to the plastic. The pieces of a Rubik's cube are typically black. During production, colored stickers are put on the outside of the cube to denote the color of a side. The plastics that are used during production are supplied to the manufacturer in a pellet form complete with the filler and colorants. These pellets can then be loaded into the molding machines directly.
We add the BrickPi3 to the LEGO assembly.  We used the LEGO EV3 “wings” to support the BrickPi3 and make it level with the BricKuber body.  This is a good step to add 8XAA batteries to the power pack and attach the BrickPi3 power pack to the LEGO assembly.  For programming you can power the BrickPi3 via USB power to the Raspberry Pi, however to move the motors you will need to supply power with the Power Pack.        
If you're reading this, you're probably holding a cube in your hand and already feeling bad about yourself for needing to look up the solution. But don't worry! In fact, most of the “super-human-intelligence beings” (a common misconception) who have solved the cube thousands of times in their lifetimes were sitting as you are now. Whether you want to learn it to impress a girl, because your friends bet you couldn't, or just to close the book on the biggest time waste of your childhood by finally defeating it, this guide will take you through the simplest way to conquer the puzzle.
The standard Rubik's cube has sides of about 2.2 in (5.7 cm) per square. Various other sizes have also been produced such as a 1.5 in (3.8 cm) mini cube, a 0.8 in (2 cm) key chain micro cube, and a 3.5 in (9 cm) giant cube. While the standard cube is a 3 × 3 × 3 segmentation other types have also been introduced. Some of the more interesting ones include the 2 × 2 × 2 cube, the 4 × 4 × 4 cube (called Rubik's Revenge) and the 5 × 5 × 5 cube. The shape has also been varied and puzzles in the form of a tetrahedral, a pyramid, and an octahedral are among types that were produced. The Rubik's cube also led to the development of game derivatives like the Rubik's cube puzzle and the Rub it cube eraser.
If you were around in the 1980’s and did not live under a rock, you had a Rubik’s cube.  It was the 3D combination puzzle that had children and adults mesmerized trying to solve the impossible puzzle.  We would spend hours twisting and turning the cube to figure the solution. The cube was invented by an Hungarian professor of architecture, Erno Rubik, in 1974.  Although it took Erno over one month to solve his very own puzzle, it  became a fad and everyone had one. Consequently, it became the world’s best selling toy ever at that time.
Repeat the process. Turn back to your blue side and repeat the turns on opposite sides. Then, return once more to the red side and turn the opposite sides in opposite directions. And last, return once more to the blue side and turn the opposite sides in opposite directions. When you finish, you should have a staircase-like zig-zag across four sides of your Rubik’s cube.[4]
Rubik's cube is a toy puzzle designed by Erno Rubik during the mid-1970s. It is a cube-shaped device made up of smaller cube pieces with six faces having differing colors. The primary method of manufacture involves injection molding of the various component pieces, then subsequent assembly, labeling, and packaging. The cube was extremely popular during the 1980s, and at its peak between 1980 and 1983, 200 million cubes were sold world wide. Today sales continue to be over 500,000 cubes sold world wide each year.
Repeat the process. Turn back to your blue side and repeat the turns on opposite sides. Then, return once more to the red side and turn the opposite sides in opposite directions. And last, return once more to the blue side and turn the opposite sides in opposite directions. When you finish, you should have a staircase-like zig-zag across four sides of your Rubik’s cube.[4] Rubiks Build It Solve It Review
An important thing to note is that this task is not a light one. It may require several hours of attempts. If you'd rather just solve the cube in your hand and forget about it rather than being able to solve any cube you're given, there are plenty of solvers available on the web. However, the satisfaction of holding a completed Rubik's Cube in your hand and thinking “I did that, and I can do it again” is greater than most, mainly due to the fact that the puzzle has been present in all our lives at some point. By the mid 1980's, an estimated fifth of the world's population had attempted to solve the cube. If you want to stand out and say that you can defeat the puzzle, time and determination is a large factor. Rubix Build
×